Posts Tagged With: design

The Others.

Have you watched that movie? Don’t you just love that incredible twist at the end? Yeah… no, we’re not going to talk about horror movies now; I have enough horror on my plate now that I’m reading Stephen King’s The Shining. But that’s an entirely different story and you probably have no interest in the nightmares this book has been giving me. No, you’re probably interested more in learning about the different clans we have in our game.

From left to right: two Thunes, two Ozars, two Kythiens and two Vaytori.

From left to right: two Thunes, two Ozars, two Kythiens and two Vaytori.

For Cedaria, we decided to step out of the box and create clans (or races) different from your typical fantasy races, and went with the Vaytori, Kythiens, Thunes and Ozars. We could’ve avoided the trouble and went with just humans or something, but having different groups allowed us to highlight more issues and present them more strongly than we would’ve been able to otherwise.  Plus, it enabled us to incorporate the concept of acceptance of the “others”. See what I did there? 😉

Uhm. Anyway. *clears throat*

You have your Vaytori, who came to the island first and thus believe they are more entitled to live on it than any of the other clans, and would’ve industrialized the entire island had it not been for the Kythiens, who care about the environment and prefer a more traditional way of living. Then you have the Thunes, who want to dominate the island’s resources, and the marginalized Ozar refugees who escaped their homeland hoping to find a better life, only to be met with rejection on the island. Continue reading

Categories: Characters, Design | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Where is our Middle-Eastern Twist?

One of the selling points of Cedaria: Blackout is that we’ve blended together steampunk and Middle-Eastern elements of architecture and style. We thought it would add a unique flair to the genre, plus it would make our game look pretty! Levantine architecture is distinguished by its arches, big windows and tile roofs, and that worked pretty well in the game’s setting.

How did we go about it? Whenever we sat down to discuss a zone on the island and the possible buildings that would go in them, we’d try to find some references that would blend with the setting. There were times when we couldn’t find any Lebanese references and had to rely on other things, but often times we lucked out. It helped that our 3D artists are both Lebanese and well-acquainted with architecture styles here in the region.

So, to show off some of what we have, I stole these from the design station I blackmailed the artists to allow me to use them I nicely asked the artists if I could showcase some of their work on the blog. They wanted to let you know that the buildings aren’t entirely complete, however, as they still need to add steampunk elements to them. But for now… here we go!

First we have our city buildings, which were based on some office buildings you can find in downtown Beirut.

We have whole rows of them in this particular area. They're so pretty to look at.

We have whole rows of them in this particular area. They’re so pretty to look at.

The artists used the above image as a reference and managed to create this beauty below:

Notice the similarities between the two? :)

Notice the similarities between the two? =]

Continue reading

Categories: Design, General | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

On Designing Cedaria: Blackout.

So today I poked Robert, our game designer, into talking a little about what goes into the process of designing Cedaria: Blackout. He and I have been working together on the many zones of the island and the missions involved in the game. However, he’s more established in the gaming industry and can provide a more apt explanation on the topic!

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Today, we thought we would talk a bit about the story and how it intertwines with the locations, clans and characters.

Crafting the Story

When we set out to create Cedaria: Blackout, we wanted the players to be able to control as much of their story as possible, while at the same time keeping a red thread throughout the game.

In essence, we wanted to present the player with meaningful goals, not a checklist of tasks they had to go through mechanically. We wanted them to think about how they could solve these problems rather than just ticking off yet another Wolf Claw to collect. For that reason, we decided that the story needed to be both flexible and dynamic in order to handle the many ways a player could complete a single objective.

Thus – the story will wrap itself around what you accomplish in the game as well as how you go about it. Solving a particular problem in a peaceful way will affect the story in a completely different way than solving it by applying force upon others. And the outcome of the solution might have deep consequences for the rest of the game. When the game ends, you will find out just how deeply rooted some of your choices have been.

Non-Player Characters (NPCs)

An important aspect to weaving the story around the character are the NPCs that you meet through your adventure. Depending on your actions both to them and their kin and clan, some might take a shine to you while others treat you with disdain.

Our dialogue system allows for unlocking dialogues that depend on your previous actions, profession and even gender should it be appropriate. Having a conversation with Silas Burcombe as a female avatar rather than a male avatar will result in a different experience. If you are an explorer, having a talk with the distinguished Professor Abigail Gregan may open up further dialogue choices that might give you an unexpected advantage or extra information.

Will the next person you meet be an ally? Or your nemesis?

Our resident sky pirate shows off to the island's sole female mechanic, while she silently judges him.

Our resident sky pirate shows off to the island’s sole female mechanic, while she silently judges him.

Zone Design for Story

We didn’t start designing the zones until we had a good idea of what the main background story of the game would be. As with NPCs, our zones have the story of the game ingrained in them at conception. When designing our zones, we took care to think not just about what points of interests there should be, but also about how the energy crisis has affected the area and how we can incorporate the zone into the story.

In addition to the energy crisis, zones have characteristics and themes unique to themselves. A thriving trade port will react to the crisis in a different way than a rural countryside or a mining colony and as a result provide a rich variety of problems to solve when visiting them.

Snapshot of Lacunda. I daresay this is Robert's favourite of all zones!

Snapshot of Lacunda. I daresay this is Robert’s favourite of all zones!

Also – please remember to come up with names for our office kitty! He really wants one!

Categories: Storyline | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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